Volume 6, Issue 3, June 2017, Page: 85-90
Securitization in Modern Politics: Complex Security Institution
Gazi Giray Gunaydin, Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Yildirim Beyazit University, Ankara, Turkey
Received: May 13, 2017;       Accepted: May 27, 2017;       Published: Jun. 29, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ss.20170603.13      View  1946      Downloads  57
Abstract
In modern politics, security is a phenomenon, which may be seen as a complex institution beyond any ordinary concept. It is not a specific term only concerning a particular area: While security is a concept, which is composed of the discrepancy between danger and precaution, securitization is an engraved phenomenon penetrating to throughout the modern life, which fear is the fundamental determinant. Without understanding the historical roots of security, it is not possible to grasp the modern security institutions. Additionally, it is clear that fear that may be acknowledged an essential element of security does not belong only modern times because of the nature of humanity. Therefore, the question of the motivations of security within the frame of fear should be answered. In this context, it is obvious that there is an immense dilemma between security and freedom in modern politics. In fact, the concept of freedom should be discussed as part of securitization policies in the modern paradigm. Because the freedom of people means the measure of limitations of individual life from now on. Additionally, the concepts of anatomo-politics and biopolitics in Michel Foucault literature may make it possible to discuss securitization in modern politics. By this means, this article pursues also the question: May securitization be equivalent of Foucault’s biopolitics? While discussing security and securitization theoretically, it is aimed to answer the question with reference to fiction, how security institutions are built. In order to glance the paradigm of securitization, Night, written by Bilge Karasu, is unique novel illustrating the construction process of fear in Turkish literature. This article is intended to challenge the concepts of security, securitization from the world of dangers and fears. Within this scope, the theoretical debate will cohere the opportunities of the literature through the night workers.
Keywords
Security, Securitization, Fear, Freedom, Modernity, Globalization, Anatomo-Politics, Biopolitics
To cite this article
Gazi Giray Gunaydin, Securitization in Modern Politics: Complex Security Institution, Social Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2017, pp. 85-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20170603.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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