Volume 7, Issue 2, April 2018, Page: 55-62
Contesting ISIS in Indonesia: Leadership and Ideological Barriers on Radicalism as Foundation to Counterterrorism
Rendy Wirawan, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Adhikatama, Departnment of International Relations, Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Received: Nov. 17, 2017;       Accepted: Dec. 14, 2017;       Published: Jan. 17, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ss.20180702.11      View  238      Downloads  18
Abstract
Southeast Asia has been considered as a fertile land compared to other regions for terrorism breeding in the world outside Middle East region as the basis of its operation. The Muslim population in Southeast Asia contributes to the vast development of terrorism in the region, specifically ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) as the widest terrorist network. Indonesia, in this context, becomes the common target of the group’s expansion due to its large Muslim population as well as its strategic location. However, though ISIS has been infiltrating the country for years and influenced some people with its radical perspective to run jihad for establishing global Islamic State, a relatively constant movement has taken place without making any significant progress of recruitment and social leverage. This essay will elaborate the reason why ISIS, though rapidly developed within the country, but can not create an apparent progress for the group regarding the expansion of its extreme ideology to the society. In line with this argument, we found two distinct factors that strain the group's radical teachings, which are leadership and ideological barriers. Leadership lies on the Jokowi's unequivocal policies on counterterrorism which enable the country, and region to some extent, to resist the external threat of ISIS. On the other hand, the group can not deal with the plural Muslim community within the country due to its different ideological perspective on Islam, precisely on jihad.
Keywords
ISIS, Radicalism, Counterterrorism, Indonesia
To cite this article
Rendy Wirawan, Adhikatama, Contesting ISIS in Indonesia: Leadership and Ideological Barriers on Radicalism as Foundation to Counterterrorism, Social Sciences. Vol. 7, No. 2, 2018, pp. 55-62. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20180702.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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